Third Kiln Pad Pop-Up Exhibition Features Chris Mayse

Chris Mayse likes what he likes.

That doesn’t necessarily mean Mayse likes the industrious effort it takes to complete the desired finished product or that the pieces he enjoys making the most remain his favorites in the end.

“I constantly feel like I’m pulled in two different directions when it comes to the work that I like to make and the work that I like to see,” says Mayse, who pairs those pieces with their counterparts in his one-day Kiln Pad Pop-up exhibition, 1-4 Sunday. Tea bowls, planters and bud vases will be for sale at the event held rain or shine in Pewabic’s courtyard.

“Stylistically, I’ve always been drawn to cleaner, more refined design objects,” says Mayse. “But then when it comes to craft ceramics — like terra cotta — I’m drawn to letting the clay be the clay.”

In this exhibition, crude, coarse sediment-heavy terra cotta and the pure, tight clay of porcelain are in direct opposition, says Mayse. For the terra cotta pieces, he wheel threw each piece fully closed — the cups started as spheres, the bud vases cones, the planters ovoids —  then scrapped the tops before applying the texture in what he describes as a rough and quick process, creating an earthy naturalistic appeal.

In contrast, Mayse’s porcelain pieces are labor intensive and time consuming near the finish because each require careful sanding and attention between four kiln firings.

“Making those, like the geometric bud vases, is painstaking for me, but I love seeing the result in the end piece,” says Mayse, who won second place for his geometric bud vase in the Maker/Mentor exhibition, currently on display in Pewabic’s upstairs gallery. An awards reception for the show is 6-8 p.m. July 21.

Mayse’s exploration of geometric porcelain sculpture began during his time at Cranbrook Academy of Art, where he earned his MFA in Ceramics in 2013.

“My education plays a big part in this. Before Cranbrook I can’t say my aesthetic was minimal,” says Mayse. “It has such a rich history of design. I think it’s unavoidable to leave there without a deep appreciation of it. There’s some kind of osmosis that happens being that close to all that art.”

The functional ceramics that surround him at Pewabic similarly influenced Mayse to move from sculpture to sculptural objects, he says, with the goal of making sculpture with an inherent practicality to it for everyday use.

“Approaching it as a sculptor became defining for me in terms of deciding what work I wanted to show. I thought it was important to approach this show conceptually. Because of that, for every porcelain object there is a mirroring terra-cotta object. I’m really interested in seeing what goes first….”

Visiting Artist Pamela Timmons Demos throughout House & Garden Weekend June 9-11

Pamela Timmons is the first to tell you she came to ceramics in a rather utilitarian, sensible way: She was a horticulturalist who ran out of vases.

“I tend to get in and jump in over my head before I know it. I just started doing that and it worked,” admits Timmons about her start in clay.

More than 35 years later, Timmons is a well-established potter and sculptor and Pewabic’s visiting artist during the 27th Annual House & Garden Show, with weekend demonstrations of how she sculpts turtles, frogs and human faces, among other subjects; decorates and carves pots; and throws on the wheel.

An artist in Pewabic’s Gallery of North American Artists, Pewabic debuted Timmons’ clay turtles almost 20 years ago at the House & Garden Show. In 2013, she added bronze turtles, on which she could incorporate details — toenails, for instance — that she couldn’t on her more fragile clay turtles.

“Pewabic has been personally supportive,” says Timmons about the first place she offered her clay turtles. Though she can’t recollect why she chose turtles as her subject: ““It completely changed my life….Every single kiln load has a turtle in it. I sell as many as I can stand to make.”

As visiting artist, Timmons plans to demonstrate how she attaches elements of her sculptures, which she says come together in phases.

“That’s something I’m interested in showing people this weekend. There are a lot of internal steps and hollowing out,” says Timmons.

“Pewabic is fabulous,” she says. “I’m surrounded by this wonderful feeling when I’m at Pewabic. I always feel like I’ve come home somehow. It feels so good to be connected to something that’s been going on so long, but in a completely contemporary fashion.”

Visiting artist Pamela Timmons will be on site for demonstrations 12-4 PM, Friday, June 9; 10 AM-4PM Saturday, June 10; and 12-4 PM Sunday, June 11.

Student Spotlight: June Mabarak

Within minutes of student June Mabarak spotting the visitor touring the education studio, she engages her in conversation and eagerly offers one of her handmade gnomes. The visitor from Washington state carefully selects a ceramic talisman and gushes graciously, announcing how she will tell friends back home how nice everyone in Detroit is.

Mabarak, an unofficial ambassador of sorts for Pewabic, turns 75 today and is one of the students and staff members featured in the upcoming Maker/Mentor exhibition opening with the 27th Pewabic House & Garden Show June 8. Her piece also is one of a handful selected to receive an award from the exhibition juried by Kaitlyn and Ryan Lawless from Detroit porcelain studio Corbé Company.

No doubt about it: Mabarak appreciates near-celebrity status at Pewabic for the good vibes and positive mojo that comes through her interactions and ceramic creations, which take shape in statuettes, bowls and necklaces, among other designs.

The former Detroit Public Schools early childhood teacher began taking classes decades ago to find a release from her hectic schedule.

“I had a lot going on and I wanted some sort of outlet,” she says. “After my first or second class I thought, ‘Gee, I really like this. I’m never going to quit here.’”

That was in 1979 and she hasn’t yet.

“I think I’m the longest consecutive student. I must be,” says the Grosse Pointe Farms resident, adding that she enjoys Pewabic’s atmosphere of freedom, peace and creativity.

When she started, Mabarak says she “hid in the corner,” worried that she wasn’t good enough for the class. She made little bowls, eventually giving one to a restaurant owner she knew, who designated it a penny bowl for guests to leave or take a penny. Soon “June’s penny bowls” began to appear throughout the Grosse Pointes and Detroit.

“I keep giving them away. What am I going to do with it all? So, I said I’m just going to give it away. I give it to my family. I give it to people who help me. I keep it in my car for when people help me.”

Right now, Mabarak is probably best known for what people warmly refer to as her “June gnomes”.

“I started making them and giving them away to people. I can’t make enough of them. Everyone wants one,” she says.

Mabarak sends her gnomes, animals, bowls and jewelry out into the world with remarkable frequency, almost as currency or mood lifters. She keeps a box in her car to thank people who help her get around, including on her visits to Pewabic’s education studio where you can find her two-to-three times a week.

“I try to come here as much as I can. I have a lot going on,” she says, pausing to say hello to teachers and other students who greet her a little like a rock star. “I just look forward to coming all the time. When I can’t come, I miss it.”

Inaugural Kiln Pad Pop-Up Exhibition: Annie E. Dennis

Give your Eastern Market Flower Day cache a beautiful home with a ceramic planter by Annie E. Dennis, the featured artist of Pewabic’s Inaugural Kiln Pad Pop-Up Exhibition, 1-4 p.m. Sunday, May 21.

Works are available for purchase on a cash-and-carry basis at this one-day exhibition, rain or shine.

A Cranbrook Academy of Art alumna and Pewabic Education Director, Dennis explores and combines her love of ceramics and gardening, both of which feed Dennis’s interests with their combination of science and art and essence of patience, creativity, and coping with loss.

“While examining these parallels I found a simple place for a plant to live,” says Dennis, whose planting containers will be the focus of the exhibition.

This is Pewabic’s first pop-up exhibit. says Darlene Carroll, Exhibit Curator, who sees it as a solution for limits placed by calendar and space.

“It seemed a logical solution to take it outside,” says Carroll, who selected Dennis as its inaugural artist. “We’re trying something that had never been done before. I think it’s going to be a fun experiment.”

Upcoming Kiln Pad Pop-Ups include Didem Mert, June 24,  and Troy Bungart, August 5.  For more information, contact exhibitions@pewabic.org.

Artist Showcase: Natalie Kuenzi and Shani Richards

This is the final installment in a series of posts highlighting artists from Dysfunctional, curated by Roberto Lugo, on display at Pewabic through May 14, 2017.

NATALIE KUENZI

hands are like flowers (We Can Be them Too), 2016

Crocheted recycled plastic, reclaimed stoneware, acrylic, glue

Natalie Kuenzi’s work draws upon both the pristine and the discarded in nature to encourage viewers to reimagine what is beautiful in both natural beauty and that which is discarded.

Kuenzi earned a Bachelor of Arts in art history and a Bachelor of Fine Arts in ceramics from Western State Colorado University and a Master of Fine Arts from Tyler School of Art at Temple University in Philadelphia. She has exhibited at the Gallery at Delaware County Community College in Philadelphia, the Katzen Art Center in Washington, D.C., and at Gallery 126 in Gunnison, Colo., among others.

SHANI RICHARDS

Bulletproof, 2015

Aluminum can tabs and jump rings

Shani Richards explores materials, objects and body adornment throughout her work including “Bulletproof,” a 2015 piece resembling modern chainmail that includes 36 x 30 inches of aluminum can tabs and jump rings made to look like a zip-up hoodie, placed on the ground to resemble a chalk outline. The piece is said to represent gunned-down Florida teen Trayvon Martin.

Richards received her Master of Fine Arts from the State University of New York, New Palz in 2016.

Artist Showcase: Christina Erives and Amy Shindo

These are the fourth and fifth artists in a series of posts highlighting Dysfunctional, curated by Roberto Lugo, on display at Pewabic through May 14, 2017.

CHRISTINA ERIVES

desayuno, 2016

earthenware

Christina Erives creates objects that reflect the traditional artistic techniques of her Mexican heritage in part because she hopes to prevent the processes from being lost.

“Through the use of various objects I hope to render a narrative that seeks to embrace and celebrate these rituals of a new generation,” she explains. “I enjoy seeing these objects evolve through the use of clay just as a story of an event can change over time in the ways of telling it. Ceramics as a material has permanence; it is one of the ways we were able to learn about ancient cultures. There is beauty in these traditions and my aim is to make a mark in my time that will be preserved in the history of ceramic objects.”

Erives earned a Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts from California State University and her Master of Fine Arts from Pennsylvania State University. She was a visiting artist at Kansas City Art Institute and a resident artist at Red Star Studios in Kansas City, Mo., and was Mexican Ceramics special artist-in-residence at the Arquetopia Foundation in Puebla, Mexico, among others. Erives currently teaches at Belger Arts Center in Kansas City, Mo.

AMY SHINDO

Nine Zero One, 2017

Stoneware

Amy Shindo builds upon her culinary experience to create art from what others might shrug off as mundane.

“My work investigates the subtle intersections of life, labour, sensation and creativity to question how objects and ritual can add new dimensions to the mundane,” she explains.

“I methodically approach my chosen materials, which often bear little or no resemblance to the products they will become. My aim is to transform the raw into experiences that reflectively highlight the potential hidden in things, and add freshness to life.”

Raised in a restaurant family and with formal training in the culinary arts, the Ontario, Canada, native often combines her culinary and clay interests. She studied ceramics at Sheridan College in Ontario, and served as Artist in Residence at the Ceramic Arts Research Centre, at the University of Sunderland, England.