Pewabic's Tile Restoration of the Women's City Club in Detroit

February 09, 2021 3 Comments

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Pewabic senior designer Genevieve Sylvia and a team of the pottery's tile artisans have been working with the Kraemer Design Group on restoring numerous tile installations found throughout the Women's City Club building in downtown Detroit. 

Genevieve discusses why this project is near to our hearts as we revisit Pewabic tile work designed over a century ago. Genevieve states in her interview, "The revitalization of this majestic building through the partnership between Pewabic and Olympia Development of Michigan is meaningful, not only in Pewabic’s story, but the story of our city.” Read the full article here

Did you know that Pewabic co-founder Mary Chase Perry Stratton was the first Vice President of the club when it was founded in 1919? Mary's husband and the architect who built Pewabic, William B. Stratton, was also responsible for the build of the clubhouse.

The Women's City Club necklace is a rectangular metal pendant with a geometric design that includes teardrop shapes and smoothly curved lines in various shades of blue. The pendant hangs from a silver chain around the neck of a woman in a navy cable knit sweater.

Commemorative Women's City Club Necklace 

The iconic geometric teardrop design found on the entryway arch was created by Mary Chase. Rich blue and green tiles are arranged amidst the glow of her signature Iridescent glazes, contributing to the impact of the tile pattern.

Pewabic's Women's City Club Pattern Tile 

Our Women's Club Pattern Tile pays homage to our Co-Founder's contribution to Detroit's architectural fabric and to her dedication and influence on the Arts & Crafts Movement within our community. Check out Pewabic Around Town on our website to explore some notable Pewabic tile installations around Detroit.

NOTE: Access to certain locations mentioned in this blog post may be prohibited.





3 Responses

Nancy Lauren LaBella
Nancy Lauren LaBella

December 03, 2022

Everything show is so special and beautiful. So pleased that it has been restored.

Jeffry Bauer
Jeffry Bauer

June 23, 2021

My mother, Adelaide, was a member of the WCC of Detroit. I learned how to swim in the pool adorned in Pewabic tiles. This was my first viewing of Pewabic tile. The year was 1960. Today I have Pewabic tiles throughout my house. I am a proud member of Pewabic.

Glenda
Glenda

April 02, 2021

I love your tile pieces and the stories behind them can’t wait until I can come in an browae your collections. I am looking for a beautiful vase for my Living Room in Navy blue or a red one for my Dining room table as a centerpiece

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